spreadyourwiings:

socially-inactive:

pyroluminescence:

I’M

I LOVE YOU KAREN

Dying

(Source: hajimenaegi, via thats-so-meme)

notesfrombakerst:

ithefool:

lol grammar puns

I laughed too much at this

(via the-absolute-funniest-posts)

Poor gall bladder. He maked them…

(Source: kickstarter.com, via the-absolute-funniest-posts)

"If someone were to die at the age of 63 after a lifelong battle with MS or Sickle Cell, we’d all say they were a “fighter” or an “inspiration.” But when someone dies after a lifelong battle with severe mental illness and drug addiction, we say it was a tragedy and tell everyone “don’t be like him, please seek help.” That’s bullshit. Robin Williams sought help his entire life. He saw a psychiatrist. He quit drinking. He went to rehab. He did this for decades. That’s HOW he made it to 63. For some people, 63 is a fucking miracle. I know several people who didn’t make it past 23 and I’d do anything to have 40 more years with them."

anonymous reader on The Dish

One of the more helpful and insightful things I’ve seen about depression/suicide in the last couple of days.

(via the-greatdepression)

(Source: mysweetetc, via finalfantasist)

curiosamathematica:

Mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani is the first woman to win a Fields Medal. It had been an all-boys club since the prizes were established in 1936. Mirzakhani, a native of Iran, is a professor at Stanford University. She won for her work on “the dynamics and geometry of Riemann surfaces and their moduli spaces.” Here’s how Nature summed up her contributions:

"Perhaps Maryam’s most important achievement is her work on dynamics," says Curtis McMullen of Harvard University. Many natural problems in dynamics, such as the three-body problem of celestial mechanics (for example, interactions of the Sun, the Moon and Earth), have no exact mathematical solution. Mirzakhani found that in dynamical systems evolving in ways that twist and stretch their shape, the systems’ trajectories “are tightly constrained to follow algebraic laws”, says McMullen. He adds that Mirzakhani’s achievements "combine superb problem-solving ability, ambitious mathematical vision and fluency in many disciplines, which is unusual in the modern era, when considerable specialization is often required to reach the frontier".

Erica Klarreich wrote a wonderful summary of Dr. Mirzakhani for Quanta magazine, which is worth a read. She’s apparently quite the generalist—deriving intellectual satisfaction in “crossing the imaginary boundaries people set up between different fields.” Among her diverse body of work outside dynamics is her doctoral dissertation on geodesics of hyperbolic surfaces, which another researcher called “the kind of mathematics you immediately recognize belongs in a textbook.” Meanwhile, she’s an unassuming character herself, with a deep love of her work and a phenomenal work ethic: "You have to spend some energy and effort to see the beauty of math."

curiosamathematica:

Mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani is the first woman to win a Fields Medal. It had been an all-boys club since the prizes were established in 1936. Mirzakhani, a native of Iran, is a professor at Stanford University. She won for her work on “the dynamics and geometry of Riemann surfaces and their moduli spaces.” Here’s how Nature summed up her contributions:

"Perhaps Maryam’s most important achievement is her work on dynamics," says Curtis McMullen of Harvard University. Many natural problems in dynamics, such as the three-body problem of celestial mechanics (for example, interactions of the Sun, the Moon and Earth), have no exact mathematical solution. Mirzakhani found that in dynamical systems evolving in ways that twist and stretch their shape, the systems’ trajectories “are tightly constrained to follow algebraic laws”, says McMullen. He adds that Mirzakhani’s achievements "combine superb problem-solving ability, ambitious mathematical vision and fluency in many disciplines, which is unusual in the modern era, when considerable specialization is often required to reach the frontier".

Erica Klarreich wrote a wonderful summary of Dr. Mirzakhani for Quanta magazine, which is worth a read. She’s apparently quite the generalist—deriving intellectual satisfaction in “crossing the imaginary boundaries people set up between different fields.” Among her diverse body of work outside dynamics is her doctoral dissertation on geodesics of hyperbolic surfaces, which another researcher called “the kind of mathematics you immediately recognize belongs in a textbook.” Meanwhile, she’s an unassuming character herself, with a deep love of her work and a phenomenal work ethic: "You have to spend some energy and effort to see the beauty of math."

(Source: joerojasburke, via gunslingerannie)

britishfilminstitute:

Lauren Bacall: a career in pictures
It’s been said before when an old Hollywood actor has died that we’ve lost another link with the golden age of the American studio system. But those links are so very, very few now, and it seemed almost surreal – until the news of her death on 12 August – that one of the era’s brightest stars, Lauren Bacall, could even still be with us. Read more

britishfilminstitute:

Lauren Bacall: a career in pictures

It’s been said before when an old Hollywood actor has died that we’ve lost another link with the golden age of the American studio system. But those links are so very, very few now, and it seemed almost surreal – until the news of her death on 12 August – that one of the era’s brightest stars, Lauren Bacall, could even still be with us. Read more

greggorysshocktheater:

“Imagination is the highest kite that can fly.” 

Rest In Peace Lauren Bacall (September 16, 1924 - August 12, 2014)

"I saw Twilight - my granddaughter made me watch it, she said it was the greatest vampire film ever. After the ‘film’ was over I wanted to smack her across her head with my shoe, but I do not want a (tell-all) book called Grannie Dearest written on me when I die. So instead I gave her a DVD of Murnau’s 1922 masterpiece Nosferatu and told her, ‘Now that’s a vampire film!’ And that goes for all of you! Watch Nosferatu instead!"

(via neil-gaiman)

thefinalimage:

Dark Passage | 1947 | dir. Delmer Daves

R.I.P. Lauren Bacall, 1924-2014

thefinalimage:

To Have and Have Not | 1944 | dir. Howard Hawks

"Hey Slim, are you still happy?"
"What do you think?"

R.I.P. Lauren Bacall, 1924-2014

thefinalimage:

The Big Sleep | 1946 | dir. Howard Hawks

"What’s wrong with you?"
"Nothing you can’t fix."

R.I.P. Lauren Bacall, 1924-2014.